New Owner of Retail Block Near Monument: No Imminent Redevelopment Plans

The new owner of the block of four retail storefronts across from the Monument plans to maintain the existing building uses, Banker & Tradesman reports.

As Jamaica Plain News reported last week, Hajjar Management Co., a developer primarily known for managing apartment buildings and developing hotels, bought 775-783 Centre St. last week for $1.72 million. The Tedeschi convenience store at the corner of Centre and Eliot streets recently closed; American Dry Cleaners, Kamado Super Fusion and JP House of Pizza continue to occupy the remaining storefronts.

According to Banker & Tradesman:

Paul Mahoney, COO for Hajjar Management, said the company has no plans for a significant redevelopment.

“It will remain as a retail use, with an updated facade in keeping with the vibrant Jamaica Plain market. It’s a great spot, and highly visible,” Mahoney said via email.

The new owners are in discussions with various replacements for Tedeschi’s, he said.

Read the full Banker & Tradesman story here (subscription required).

Four storefronts at 775-783 Centre Street were bought by Hajjar Management Co.

Four storefronts at 775-783 Centre Street were bought by Hajjar Management Co.

Kamada Super Fusion, American Dry Cleaners and JP House of Pizza are active businesses on the block.

Kamada Super Fusion, American Dry Cleaners and JP House of Pizza are active businesses on the block.

  • Ellie

    I would like to see a Starbucks go into the vacant space.

    • return

      The last thing JP needs is another coffee shop.

      • Ellie

        You’re right. But my hope is that a shop selling a decent cup of coffee will put one (or two, or three) of the other “local” coffee selling places out of business.

        • ImmodestyBlaise

          Seriously? You want people to lose their jobs and businesses? You want the community to lose the few places where they can work, hang out, and meet their neighbors? If you don’t like the coffee at City Feed, that’s fine. Don’t buy it. But please don’t wish ruin on local businesses that are run by people and neighbors who are committed to JP.

          • Marty

            Well said!

          • Ellie

            Seriously, you expect people to shell out good money for a mediocre product or service? If you choose to sell a quality product that there is a demand for then people will probably support you and you’ll be successful. If you try to sell crap to people then most folks, given a decent alternative, will choose someplace else to eat, hang out, and meet neighbors, and you will probably end up working for the guy who has the brains to sell something people want to spend their hard earned money on. Locally owned means locally owned, it doesn’t automatically mean good, and it certainly doesn’t deserve, nor will it get my money. If your fave coffee joint closes it will be on them. If you choose to blame the competition, then blame them for doing a better job than the other guy. Please take your misplaced phony insincere do-dooder crybaby millennialesque whining SOME PLACE ELSE.

          • Hh

            You are confusing “tastes good” with “tastes good enough”.

            Just because Starbucks is widespread and popular does not mean that its food and drinks tastes superior to competition’s. It merely means that they are able to finance their store expansions cheaper than others in the industry, either by reallocating internal capital or by using their size to get good terms on their loans.

            Soullessness aside, chains have a long history of initially keeping prices artificially low to drive out the competition. Once consumer choice is taken away, the prices go up to make up for lost profits in the past. Effectively, you’re paying for driving out competition or of business, something that is against your interests as a consumer.

            The difference with locally owned stores is that their fortunes are tied to that of the neighborhood much tighter, forcing them to respond to local, rather than corporate needs. Some don’t and go out of business as a result.

          • Ellie

            So 60,000,000 customers a year are wrong, and you’re right. Brilliant argument.

          • ImmodestyBlaise

            I like you, Ellie. You crack me up.

          • Marty

            Your cup of java is not my cup of java. For me, Starbucks coffee and many of their ilk, are too strong and bitter. If I want strong and bitter, I buy me an expresso. If I want strong and sweet, I go to El Oriental for Cuban coffee. When I want a consistent, American style cup of coffee, I go to DD’s. Nobody makes a better ice coffee man!. This is my personal taste not anyone else. As a community person,I appreciate the independently owned stores because they make my piece of heaven unique and awesome. Clearly, you have a thing for Starbucks, like a THING. So, why not move to where there are many within walking distance?

        • Monster

          It seems like you have a very brand-specific definition of what “decent” coffee tastes like.

  • Marty

    Surely you jest…

    • Shirley

      I never jest and don’t call me Shirley

  • Ellie

    Why do so many people think that the mom&pop stores that sell an inferior product deserve our business solely because they’re independent? Starbucks sells a consistently superior product; THAT’S a pretty good reason to patronize them, I would say.

    • Money is Powerful

      Ellie, we don’t need a sterile retail chain. Power to the people you corporate shill.

      • Ellie

        you’re right, what JP needs is, oh, i don’t know, maybe another Dunkin, because three places to buy DD within a one mile stretch of Centre St. isn’t nearly adequate. I say enough of the crap product sold at (gasp!) city feed, jp licks, and their ilk. Bring on a decent product, for a change.

  • JPer

    I predict that within one year there are plans presented to raise that block to put in a three story building, with overpriced retail storefronts on the ground level, and overpriced luxury apartments on the upper levels.

  • Em

    How about a damn grocery store? (With actual affordable prices)

    • Ellie

      Why don’t you open one?

      • Money is Powerful

        What a troll. Yes, you Ellie. A damn troll!

        • Ellie

          Yes, dear; anyone with an opinion differing from yours must be a troll. That’s really constructive of you. Your overindulgent mommy sure did the world a favor when she raised you, yessiree, little man.