Community Meeting for 125 Amory St. Renovation and Expansion Thursday

A community meeting to discuss the proposed renovation and expansion of the 125 Amory St. public housing project will be held Thursday, Sept. 22, from 6 to 8 p.m.

A rendering of the proposed 125 Amory St.

ICON Architecture, via JPNDC

A rendering of the proposed 125 Amory St.

The project, which is expected to be formally filed with the Boston Redevelopment Authority this fall, entails the preservation and renovation of the 215 apartments on Boston Housing Authority-owned land at 125 Amory St., which houses senior and disabled residents. The proposal would not displace current residents, and also calls for the creation of new housing on the site, to the tune of 300 to 350 new mixed-income apartments, approximately one-third of which would be deemed affordable. In total, more than 60 percent of the total site would be considered affordable, with the remaining units rented at market rates. The project would also include some landscaping and parking improvements.

Thursday’s meeting, which will be held in the community room at 125 Amory St., is the second community meeting to discuss the project, which represents a partnership between the Jamaica Plain Neighborhood Development Cooperation (JPNDC), The Community Builders and Urban Edge.

The 125 Amory St. building was originally built as a factory in 1915. The Boston Housing Authority bought the empty factory and converted it to apartments for the elderly and disabled in 1973.

For more information from the first community meeting, visit the JPNDC’s website and read the Jamaica Plain Gazette’s coverage of the evening’s discussion.

Previously on Jamaica Plain News:

Giant Elderly and Disabled Housing at 125 Amory Street Eyed for Renovation

125 Amory St. was selected by the Boston Housing Authority in part because it had land to add more housing.

Richard Heath

125 Amory St is on a 3 acre site. It was selected by the BHA in part because it had land to add more housing.

  • Robert Ellis

    So “non-profits” JPNDC, Urban Edge, and Community Builders are building 200+ fully market-rate units in the heart of JP to rake it in. And they are including apartments in a building they don’t even own as part of their affordable total.

    If even they won’t do 100% affordable housing, why should private developers be expected to?