JP Resident Running Boston Marathon For Mass. Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Jamaica Plain resident Ryan Pace will be running his 24th consecutive Boston Marathon this year. The 44-year-old will be running for The Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired (MABVI) with the Team with a Vision in 2017.

Jamaica Plain resident Ryan Pace is running his 24th consecutive Boston Marathon. The 44-year-old first ran the Boston Marathon in 1994. He will running for the Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired  with the Team with a Vision in 2017.

A volunteer for Community Servings and the Real Estate Advisory Committee of the Urban Land Institute, Pace is involved in many charitable running clubs across Massachusetts. It was in a Boston running club where Pace met his wife, and the two now have a 5-year-old-son.

Of the many marathons he has run, Pace recalls the 2014 Boston Marathon as one of his more memorable ones. After the tragedy that struck the year before, Pace was honored to be a part of helping the city recover, and get back on its feet. In addition to that, Pace finished the 2005 Philadelphia Marathon in 2:56:04, his best time. In 2017, he looks to continue his running of the Boston Marathon, this time in support of the Team with a Vision.

For the last 24 years members of Team With A Vision have toed the starting line on Marathon Monday and shown the world that “disability” does not mean “inability.” This international team of runners, who are visually impaired, sighted guides, and fundraisers race to support individuals throughout Massachusetts living with vision loss. Their efforts allow the Massachusetts Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired (MABVI) to deliver professional, peer, and volunteer support to over 1,200 individuals each year, giving them the support they need to live with dignity and independence.

All funds raised support MABVI’s statewide network of vision rehabilitation services, which include 14 low vision centers, 34 low vision peer support groups, and 300 volunteers matched 1:1 with individuals who are blind or visually impaired.