Q&A: Ayanna Pressley on Running for Congress, How She Varies from Capuano, #MeToo and Human Trafficking

At-Large Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley is running for U.S. Congress to challenge fellow Democrat and longtime incumbent Michael Capuano. Pressley answered questions from Jamaica Plain News about her candidacy, why she's chosen to buck the system and challenge an incumbent within the same party, her city council accomplishments and more. Q: You're running for the 7th District of the U.S. Congress while serving on the Boston City Council. How are you balancing a congressional campaign and your council work? Pressley: I’m running for Congress to elevate the work I’ve done on the Boston City Council.

Walsh Cruises to Second Term; Six Women Now on City Council

As expected Mayor Martin Walsh easily defeated District 7 City Councilor Tito Jackson for a second term. But it was the Boston City Council races that were more interesting. Walsh took 65% of the vote to Jackson's 33%, according to unofficial results as of 10:30 pm on Tuesday. The only truly contested race in Jamaica Plain was the District 7 race (there's a little bit of District 7 in JP by Egleston Square). After a preliminary that had more than a dozen candidates Kim Janey and Rufus Faulk faced each other.

City Councilors to Massport and FAA: Plane Noise is ‘Unbearable’

Much to the frustration of Jamaica Plain residents and those in other Boston neighborhoods, there has been a noticeable increase in airplane noise in recent months. Several Boston city councilors recently wrote a letter to the Federal Aviation Administration and Massport to express their own concerns, as well as their constituents' reported vexation. Seven city councilors representing Jamaica Plain, Hyde Park, Mattapan, Roslindale and West Roxbury penned the letter to Amy Lind Corbett, the regional administrator of the New England region for the FAA, and Thomas Glynn, CEO of Massport. "Nearly every morning, planes begin to fly overhead at or before 6 a.m. and often continue essentially non-stop for hours at a time. This can negatively impact an individual’s sleeping pattern, acuity, and quality of life," says the letter.

CJ Reese, who like a large majority of the staff lives in or very near JP, tends bar.

City Floats 15 JP-Only Alcohol Licenses

Jamaica Plain businesses would get five new booze licenses a year for three years under a proposal floated Monday. Mayor Marty Walsh and City Councilor At-Large Ayanna Pressley announced the plan, which would add a total of 105 licenses to JP, Hyde Park, Roxbury, East Boston, Dorchester, Mattapan and Mission Hill. In a holdover from the days when the state did not trust Boston to distribute its own booze licenses, a restauranteur faces six-digit costs and Byzantine rules to serve vodka, stout or chardonnay. All licenses are tightly regulated and involve approvals at both the state and city levels. Pressley, taking up liquor licenses as an economic development issue, shepherded a similar program through in 2014.

City Councilors: Employers Shouldn’t Use Credit Checks to Discriminate

Two Boston City Councilors have proposed an ordinance to prevent employment discrimination based on credit checks. District 4 City Councilor Andrea Campbell and At-Large City Councilor Ayanna Pressley cosponsored the proposed ordinance that will be discussed on Sept. 29 in a public hearing. The current City of Boston Code protects people from being discriminated based on a host of things: race, sex, gender identity or expression, age, ability, national origin ancestry, religion, sexual orientation, parental status, ex-offender status, prior psychiatric treatment and military status. But some employers use credit checks as a determining factor to hire a possible employee. The ordinance states, "...individuals burdened with student loans, medical bills, or those who have been involved in the criminal justice system," are being adversely affected while seeking employment.