Led By JP Resident, ESC Celebrates 35 Years of Helping Nonprofits

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Julie Crockford, a Jamaica Plain resident and ESC’s Executive Director, awards Brian McGrory, editor of the Boston Globe, the ESC Corporate Citizenship Award (Photo by Bill Brett)

Empower Success Corps (ESC) – an organization dedicated to helping nonprofits in New England succeed – recently celebrated its 35th anniversary with an event at the Larz Anderson Auto Museum in Brookline.

Julie Crockford, a Jamaica Plain resident and ESC’s Executive Director, awards Brian McGrory, editor of the Boston Globe, the ESC Corporate Citizenship Award (Photo by Bill Brett)

Julie Crockford, a Jamaica Plain resident and ESC’s executive director for the past two years, welcomed attendees including past and present clients, consultants and other key influencers in the nonprofit world.

“In the past three and a half decades, we have helped over 2,000 nonprofits operate more effectively to meet the needs of their communities,” said Crockford. “We’re happy to be here tonight to celebrate this milestone but we couldn’t do this without the hard work and dedication of our incredibly brilliant consultants.”

Through consulting, talent-matching, and professional development programs, ESC helps nonprofits build capacity by matching organizations with experienced, dedicated and caring professionals at a highly affordable rate.

“What makes us unique is the quality of our talent and their ability to share their wisdom. Together, we focus on helping clients succeed, do more, and have a significant impact," said Crockford.

As part of the event, ESC awarded its first ever Corporate Citizenship Award to The Boston Globe. Accepting the honor was Brian McGrory, editor of The Boston Globe. Under McGrory’s tutelage, the news organization has won four Pulitzer Prizes -- for breaking news in its coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings, for feature photography, for commentary and for editorial writing.

“We chose the Boston Globe for this award for their commitment to always getting at the truth – even when it isn’t pretty. By covering topics our sister nonprofits address – homelessness, hunger, immigration, civil liberties, the environment, and the arts – the Globe sheds light on how these issues are impacting our communities and what we can do to help,” said Crockford.

Over the years, ESC has worked with a number of nonprofits in the Jamaica Plain area including the Elizabeth Stone House, an organization that helps adult and child survivors of domestic violence and related; Ethos, a nonprofit that promotes the independence, dignity, and well-being of the elderly and disabled; and Family Services of Greater Boston, an organization that helps break the cycle of intergenerational family disadvantage. Past projects have focused on a variety of areas including strategic planning, fundraising strategies, board development and branding.

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