Saturday Forest Bathing

2nd & 4th Saturdays in April and May, 9:00am-11:00am
Tam Willey, Certified Forest Therapy Guide

Location: Bussey St. Gate Entrance at map tables

Forest Bathing is inspired by Shinrin-yoku, a prominent feature of preventative medicine and healing in Japan.  From increased cerebral blood flow to stronger immune defenses, there has been extensive research demonstrating what can happen when we relax, unplug and open our senses to the natural world in community. This slow-paced guided therapeutic experience promotes wellness through a series of gentle sensory-opening invitations that welcome us to notice more of our natural surroundings.  By deepening our connection with the natural world and each other, we open ourselves up to the healing medicine of the forest.  Forest Bathing is part of a global effort to tend to the stressful conditions of living in modern industrialized civilization. Tam is a Certified Forest Therapy Guide, Training Apprentice and Mentor with the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy Guides and Programs. Tam believes the practice of Forest Bathing can deepen and broaden our relationships. Tam’s training includes an understanding of the scientific framework of Forest Therapy as well as the cultural repair that is made possible by holding space for seekers of this medicine to share and bear witness in community as part of the natural world.  Tam created Toadstool Walks as a way to offer support in finding one’s own way towards experiencing belonging to the natural world.

How the Arboretum Became the Arboretum: The First 25 Years

Emily Wheeler, Arboretum Docent

Sunday, May 5, 11:00am-12:30pm
Location: Centre Street Gate

1090 Centre Street, Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
The Arnold Arboretum did not come into existence full-formed, but had a long adolescence before it (literally) blossomed at 50. Our first director, Charles Sargent, prepared a 50-year report in 1922, before the end of his own 54-year tenure. But, what about the first 25 years? We don't have a 25-year report, however, we do have photos and the engaging stories from that time. Join our docent to hear those stories, as she takes you on a timeline through the walnut and oak collections, to the beeches, and back via Bussey Hill.

Landscape Plant Selection, Planting, and Establishment

Andrew Gapinski, Head of Horticulture, Arnold Arboretum

1 Session: Saturday, May 4, 1:00–3:30pm
Location: Hunnewell Building and Landscape

Ensuring the long-term health of your landscape starts with healthy plants from the nursery, proper site selection and preparation, and sound planting and establishment. Andrew Gapinski will discuss professional standards and techniques, along with common issues and solutions for both balled-and-burlapped and containerized specimens. He will focus on landscape trees, shrubs, and perennials – ornamental annuals and vegetables will not be covered in this offering. Class will start indoors and then move outdoors to the Dana Greenhouse Nursery. Fee: $30 member, $42 nonmember

Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277.

Census Challenge! – Biodiversity Sampling

Arnold Arboretum Staff and Volunteers
Sunday, April 28 2019, 2:00pm-4:00pm 
Location: North Woods

This is part of the new Science in Our Park Series. Come to the Arnold Arboretum and be a scientist! Get your hands onto scientific tools, use your observation skills and share your findings with others. Census Challenge will test your categorizing and observational skills. Join us in the North Woods and help us catalog the diversity of living organisms found in a small area.

Saturday Forest Bathing

2nd & 4th Saturdays in April and May, 9:00am-11:00am
Tam Willey, Certified Forest Therapy Guide

Location: Bussey St. Gate Entrance at map tables

Forest Bathing is inspired by Shinrin-yoku, a prominent feature of preventative medicine and healing in Japan.  From increased cerebral blood flow to stronger immune defenses, there has been extensive research demonstrating what can happen when we relax, unplug and open our senses to the natural world in community. This slow-paced guided therapeutic experience promotes wellness through a series of gentle sensory-opening invitations that welcome us to notice more of our natural surroundings.  By deepening our connection with the natural world and each other, we open ourselves up to the healing medicine of the forest.  Forest Bathing is part of a global effort to tend to the stressful conditions of living in modern industrialized civilization. Tam is a Certified Forest Therapy Guide, Training Apprentice and Mentor with the Association of Nature and Forest Therapy Guides and Programs. Tam believes the practice of Forest Bathing can deepen and broaden our relationships. Tam’s training includes an understanding of the scientific framework of Forest Therapy as well as the cultural repair that is made possible by holding space for seekers of this medicine to share and bear witness in community as part of the natural world.  Tam created Toadstool Walks as a way to offer support in finding one’s own way towards experiencing belonging to the natural world.