A Walk in the Arboretum: Digital Photocollages by Amy Ragus

Virtual Art Exhibition

Photographer Amy Ragus specializes in multiple frame images of New England landscapes—digital photocollages. Before and during the pandemic, Ragus spent time in the Arboretum, particularly interested in its role as a public space, its open access to everyone. Her work captures the discoveries she found just off a road or path, as well as the people who share this space and enjoy nature throughout the seasons. Explore her sensitive, creative depictions of walks in the Arboretum in this virtual exhibition.

Resurgence!

The Centre for Faith, Art, and Justice, the non-profit organization sponsored and housed by First Baptist Church in Jamaica Plain, will be hosting a series of three outdoor events on April 10, April 17, and April 24 at 7pm. The purpose of these events is to highlight our Capital Campaign to finish the rebuild of our upstairs sanctuary/community space which was originally destroyed when our building burned down in 2005. The events will highlight our “Resurgence” projection show created by MASARY which will be shown across the front of our building every night from 7pm to 10pm from now until the first week of May. In addition, the events will feature live music and performances from local artists, speeches from community leaders and activists, as well as more information on the work the Centre does in our community and the work we hope to do in the future with our newly renovated space.

Painting Edo at the Arnold Arboretum: Japanese Black Pine

"Painting Edo" at the Arnold Arboretum is a collaboration between the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University and the Harvard Art Museums, inspired by the exhibition "Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection." Observing artworks from the exhibition alongside the living collections of the Arnold Arboretum, we invite you to marvel at the remarkable accuracy and spirit with which artists of the Edo period (1615–1868) rendered their botanical subjects. In this online talk, curator Rachel Saunders and William (Ned) Friedman of the Arnold Arboretum, will discuss the Japanese black pine (黒松 kuromatsu), or Pinus thunbergii. After Rachel takes a close look at a dynamic painted specimen by Itō Jakuchū 伊藤若冲 (1716–1800) in the Feinberg Collection, Ned will bring viewers into the landscape of the Arnold Arboretum to learn about the live specimen’s unique characteristics. Led by:

Rachel Saunders, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Curator of Asian Art, Harvard Art Museums

William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University

JP Pop-up Art Show | Grand Opening |45 On Burnett | Jamaica Plain

Join us for a grand opening celebration at 45 On Burnett! Sunday March 1, 11:00 am – 12:30 pm

Tour the last 2 and 3 bedroom units - garage parking included
Check out the on-site gym, roof deck and pet spa
Visit the JP Pop-up Art Gallery featuring the work of local artist
Enjoy Brunch from Exodus Bagels
Speak with an expert mortgage broker from Joseph Smith's Guaranteed Rate team

One of the few brand-new elevator buildings in Jamaica Plain, 45 On Burnett offers garage parking, roof deck, on-site gym and dog spa. Enjoy an easy commute to downtown Boston, Longwood Medical, Back Bay, South End and all that the city has to offer
Bike around town and enjoy convenient, indoor bike storage
Walk to Forest Hills Orange Line and Commuter Rail station
Commute on new Orange Line trains entering service

View photos and floor plans at 45onburnett.com

 

 

Art Reception – The Light You Cannot See: Infrared Photography by Betsey Henkels

Join our exhibiting artist, Betsey Henkels, for a reception in the Hunnewell Lecture Hall on Saturday, October 26, 1:00-3:00pm. Exhibit runs October 25, 2019 – February 2, 2020

Betsey Henkels uses the camera to explore the world in two ways–first by noticing and appreciating objects that she might otherwise overlook, and second, by transforming ordinary scenes into prints that are compelling and unexpected. Henkels spent many hours in the Arboretum, photographing tree canopies, bark, and above ground roots in infrared. Infrared is magical and mysterious. The photographer shoots images without knowing exactly what will show up in the print.