Compost Compendium

Conor Guidarelli, Horticulturist, Arnold Arboretum

[Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill Building and Landscape]

Horticulturist Conor Guidarelli manages the Arnold Arboretum’s organic materials recycling area and has recently improved the production and quality of the resulting compost. Conor will discuss the components of compost and the nutrients that can be returned to a site when compost is applied. He will explain the mix of brown to green materials, moisture, and aeration. Class participants will start in the classroom and then travel to the Arboretum’s materials yard to see compost in various stages of development. Fee $30
Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277.

Gardening for Butterflies and Moths

Colin McCallum-Cook, Horticultural Technologist

Learn how to attract butterflies and moths to your garden and cater to their unique lifecycle requirements in this program focused exclusively on lepidopteran-friendly gardening techniques. Lepidopteran conservation in New England is more important than ever, as many formerly common species are now threatened with extirpation. Colin McCallum-Cook will also show you how to use citizen science applications to monitor species in your garden and contribute valuable data to the cause of lepidopteran conservation. Fee $32

Register at my.arboretum.harvard.edu or call 617-384-5277.

Lily Show at the Arnold Arboretum

Enjoy hundreds of fragrant lily flowers at the 72nd Annual International Lily Show. You will be amazed by the vibrant colors and diversity of scents on display. Discover the genus Lilium! For more information and to contact us email arbweb@arnarb.harvard.edu or call 617.384.5209.

The Substance of Soil

Soil is the basis of survival. Without soil, humans and most other living beings could not exist. Conor Guidarelli, who has dug deep into the soils of the Arnold Arboretum will present an overview of soil, from its formation and components to its properties. He will discuss ways to analyze soil quality and health to determine whether or not amendments are needed based on the soil outcome/use desired. Participants are encouraged to bring a pint glass jar with about a cup of soil in it to class.

Sprout Lands: Tending the Endless Gift of Trees

William Bryant Logan, Certified Arborist, Founder and President of Urban Arborists, Inc., and Author

Thursday, June 27, 6:30–7:45pm
Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Building

When his company was asked to pollard trees in front of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, William Bryant Logan was stymied. This prompted him to research and learn this ancient way of pruning that prompts thick nests of sprouts to form on major branches. The irony here is that pollarding (and the similar practice of coppicing) had been the preeminent way in which humans had tended trees–from the last ice age to the Industrial Revolution. What would have seemed the most mundane of tasks to a villager in the Middle Ages had slipped from use, and even memory, in the twenty first century. Hear Logan speak of the many ways in which these lost ancient arts (including pruning, hazel creating living hedges, growing oak for ships) created and supported human cultures all over the world and how we once lived closely as partners with trees, as we can only hope to do again.