Frisky Feline ‘Starfish’ is Lucky to be Alive after Losing a Leg in Car Strike in South Boston

A friendly, ghost-white cat now named “Starfish” is lucky to be alive after she was rushed to the MSPCA’s Angell Animal Medical Center on April 27 by a good Samaritan who found her injured and cowering under a car in South Boston during a rain storm, the MSPCA-Angell announced on May 10. The cat—who MSPCA staffers believe is about seven months old—weighs about eight pounds and was wearing a red collar when she was found but had no identification tag or microchip, making it impossible to identify an owner. She arrived critically injured, with her left hind leg nearly crushed and her rear right paw stripped away, likely from being trapped and dragged under the wheel of a car. Scared, Broken and Cold
Starfish was found hiding underneath a car on the corner of Summer and East Second Street in South Boston, streets adjacent to a number of active construction zones and marked by high-speed traffic. Laura (Savard) Gallagher, a nearby resident, spotted her beside the car’s wheel as a cold rain drenched the neighborhood.

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Springtime Temperature Rise Brings Concerns for Dog Safety

With almost 70,000 animals treated each year, the MSPCA’s Angell Animal Medical Center is one of the busiest 24-7 emergency and specialty veterinary hospitals in the world—and springtime in New England is one of the busiest seasons. “After a long winter we’re arriving at what feels like spring, and the longer days, sunshine and warming temperatures are encouraging us to spend as much time outside as possible,” said Dr. Kiko Bracker of Angell’s Emergency & Critical Care Unit. “But we must remember that our pets have spent the last six months mostly inside and disaster—in the form of heat stroke or death—can strike if they’re suddenly forced to engage in strenuous outdoor activity without time to acclimate.”

Warm Temperatures Demand Caution
Dr. Bracker urges caution to ensure the transition from the lazy winter slumber to springtime excess goes smoothly for pets. Topping the list of veterinarians’ concerns: heat. “Most people think the intense late summer heat waves are the most dangerous period for pets—but in reality we see far more cases of heat stroke in the early spring,” said Dr. Bracker.

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Angell Animal Medical Center: Protect Dogs Against Canine Version of Flu Virus

Flu season is well underway in Massachusetts—and with it the body aches, congestion, fatigue and other ills associated with our collective seasonal misery. Now veterinarians at the MSPCA’s Angell Animal Medical Center in Boston are concerned about a second category of potential victims: dogs. There is zero risk of dogs contracting human flu—nor is there a canine flu epidemic underway in Massachusetts. However, several states, including Illinois, Georgia and Kentucky, are racking up hundreds of positive canine flu tests and that has the veterinary community concerned. “This flu season has been severe for humans and that’s why there is so much attention on flu right now,” said Dr. Virginia Sinnott of Angell Animal Medical Center.

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Long Suffering ‘Scottish Fold’ Kitten Arrives in Boston by Way of NYC and Ukraine

If cats could talk we would be amazed by the stories they could tell. Such is the case with Scottie, a four-month-old purebred Scottish Fold kitten surrendered to the MSPCA’s Angell Animal Medical Center in November in very ill health and a back story that beggars belief. Scottie was bred in the Ukraine and then imported to a kitten reseller in New York. She was then purchased online by an individual in Boston and shipped to Massachusetts. Owing to her long and arduous journey—as well as the premature separation from her mother—Scottie arrived with a severe upper respiratory infection, and she was significantly underweight.

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MSPCA Rescues Street Kitten Whose Collar had Embedded Into Her Skin

A social and outgoing kitten now named “Nickie” is breathing a sigh of relief at the MSPCA-Angell after shelter veterinarians surgically removed a collar last Thursday that had embedded itself so deeply into her neck that her skin had grown around it. Nickie was spotted several times in Dorchester by an anonymous good Samaritan who ultimately came to her aid, plucking her from the street and bringing her to the shelter on Nov. 1. Dr. Cynthia Cox, director of shelter medicine for the MSPCA, was first to examine Nickie, who remained friendly and gentle throughout despite the pain associated with the collar growing into her skin. “This unfortunately is an injury we’ve seen before,” said Dr. Cox, who surgically removes collars from one or two cats every year—even as dozens more arrive at the shelter with “severely constricted” collars.

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