Painting Edo at the Arnold Arboretum: Japanese Black Pine

"Painting Edo" at the Arnold Arboretum is a collaboration between the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University and the Harvard Art Museums, inspired by the exhibition "Painting Edo: Japanese Art from the Feinberg Collection." Observing artworks from the exhibition alongside the living collections of the Arnold Arboretum, we invite you to marvel at the remarkable accuracy and spirit with which artists of the Edo period (1615–1868) rendered their botanical subjects. In this online talk, curator Rachel Saunders and William (Ned) Friedman of the Arnold Arboretum, will discuss the Japanese black pine (黒松 kuromatsu), or Pinus thunbergii. After Rachel takes a close look at a dynamic painted specimen by Itō Jakuchū 伊藤若冲 (1716–1800) in the Feinberg Collection, Ned will bring viewers into the landscape of the Arnold Arboretum to learn about the live specimen’s unique characteristics. Led by:

Rachel Saunders, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Curator of Asian Art, Harvard Art Museums

William (Ned) Friedman, Director of the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University

Watch Actors’ Shakespeare Project’s ‘Nature of Shakespeare’ at Arboretum Oct. 17

“Sweet are the uses of adversity and this our life free from public haunt finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones and good in everything. I would not change it.” Duke Senior, As You Like It, Act II. Scene I

On one perfect day in late summer, a small troop of actors, a director, and videographer traveled through the Arnold Arboretum’s landscape—south to north, Peters Hill to the Maple Collection—to film selections from the works of William Shakespeare in seven different locations. The results of their work, incorporating scenes and sonnets with a focus on the natural world, marks the third collaboration between Actors’ Shakespeare Project and the Arnold Arboretum. The Nature of Shakespeare will be presented in two parts, each live-streamed via virtual platforms, with experts from the Arboretum illuminating each specific natural area featured.

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JP Has Highest Tree Canopy, According to City

Jamaica Plain and surrounding neighborhoods in southwestern Boston have the highest tree canopies in the city. Generally speaking, the tree canopy is the part of the city shaded by trees. The city recently released a tree canopy assessment for 2014-2019. This year's worth of analysis is from high-quality, high resolution LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) images captured during airplane flyovers of Boston, according to a press release. Boston's Parks and Recreation Department commissioned the report to understand which areas have the most potential for increased tree cover, and analyze how the city's canopy cover has changed.

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Car Lanes Going Bye Bye for New Buffered Bikes Lanes on Arborway as Early as This Fall

While the Department of Conservation and Recreation work on a longterm plan to improve the Arborway, some short-term changes, including buffered bike lanes are coming as early as this fall. 

"We are proposing to remove travel lanes in three locations. Before making this
proposal, we carefully reviewed pre-pandemic traffic volumes (on which we have collected data on several occasions over many years) for the corridor," wrote Jeffrey Parenti, Deputy Chief Engineer for DCR. The short-term improvements could also begin in spring 2021. Parenti provided a list of short-term improvements and the intended goals of the changes. The changes include:

Adding clear lane lines to Murray Circle.

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Letter to the Editor: Open Parking Around the Arnold Arboretum

The city should reopen parking on the streets abutting the Arnold Arboretum. Parking was closed on the Arborway and Bussey Street this spring reacting to and anticipating the welcome-back-to-warm-weather crowds and Lilac Sunday. Since then COVID infection rates have been dramatically reduced, and we have learned that the safest place is outside. The Arnold Arboretum is a 281-acre open space jewel in the heart of the city. Never have we needed the availability of open parks more for both our physical and mental health.

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