Who are the Suffragist Heroines of Jamaica Plain?

August 26 is the 100th anniversary of the official certification of the ratification of the 19th amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which banned states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to citizens on the basis of sex. Jamaica Plain was an important place in the suffrage movement, where many women's-rights agitators made their home. Judith Winsor Smith, who lived in Jamaica Plain in the latter part of her long life, was a suffragist and abolitionist. When she voted for the first time, in 1920, at the age of 99, she was dubbed "the oldest suffragist of them all." In Jamaica Plain she lived with her daughter, Zilpha Smith, who was a pioneer in the development of the field of family social work in Boston.

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Historical Society Leading (Real Life) Walking Tours of Stony Brook, Hyde Square, Jamaica Pond and More

The Jamaica Plain Historical Society is leading four real life walking tours during the next four weekends. The hourlong tours are on Saturdays . The tour schedule is as follows: Stony Brook; Hyde Square; Green Street; and Jamaica Pond. JPHS has had to adapt their tours to modern pandemic times. "Luckily, the tours are all outside and that also makes things safer.

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The History of 3326 Washington Street: The Turnpike School from 1851

From looking at the old J.P. Auto Glass building at 3326 Washington St., one wouldn't think that the building is from the 1850s. A development company has applied to demolish a Washington Street property. But before that happens, let's learn about the history of the building. The following article was first published on Historic Boston Incorporated, and an earlier version was published on the Jamaica Plain Historical Society page. It is being republished on Jamaica Plain News with permission from HBI.

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JP Forum on Apr. 4: It’s Time to Change the State’s Racist Flag & Seal

The next Jamaica Plain Forum will be discussing how to change Massachusetts' official flag and seal, which is regarded as a symbol of white supremacy. "The current flag and seal, which features a Colonial broadsword held in a white hand over the head of a composite 'Ideal Native American,' is one of two state flags in the United States that remains controversial due to its representation of white supremacy," says the Jamaica Plain Forum website. (The other state is Mississippi, which still uses the Confederate Stars and Bars.)

For more than 30 years there has been proposed legislation to establish a special commission to review the state flag and seal, while working with Native American leaders of the Commonwealth to create a new flag and seal. This year state Rep. Nika Elugardo, D-15th Suffolk District, co-filed a bill to establish the commission. Elugardo is one of the scheduled speakers for the April 4th forum.

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The History of 197 Green Street

At first glance, the house at 197 Green Street is unique for its small size and the colorful graffiti that has covered its exterior since 2016 -- the result of collaboration between the owner and real estate developer City Realty Group and artists. City Realty Group is currently awaiting approval from the city to demolish the now-vacant house and build a four-story, mixed-use development. But if we look behind its 1950’s siding, and comb the historical record, we discover that the house is not, as it might first appear, an outdated structure. Rather, the house represents a significant period of time in the development of Jamaica Plain, and of Green Street in particular. 197 Green Street is likely the last remaining building on the east end of Green Street that was built at the start of the neighborhood’s transition from a rural landscape of farms and country estates to both a suburb for commuters and a home for middle-class residents who also worked locally.

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