Learn What Boston’s Pre-Revolutionary Newspaper Wars Tell Us About Today’s News Media

A long time before cable networks, social media and the 24-hour news cycle colonial journalists presented news to the public in the pre-Revolutionary War era. On Tuesday, author and historian J.L. Bell will  be at the Loring-Greenough House discussing how America's early news outlets worked in that volatile era and how it may relate to today's modern media landscape. Before the Revolutionary War there were numerous media outlets: The Boston Gazette and The Massachusetts Spy were to the left, The Boston News-Letter, The Boston Chronicle and Boston Weekly Post-Boy were to the right, and The Boston Evening-Post was a centrist newspaper. Back in those days the newspaper business got nasty through competitive rivalries and even got violence. The topic of America's Revolutionary is right in Bell's wheelhouse, as he specializes in "history, analysis, and unabashed gossip about the start of the American Revolution in Massachusetts."

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JP Resident Receives City Grant to Support ‘The Pineapple Diaries’ Web Series

Jamaica Plain's Paloma Valenzuela recently received a city grant to support writing and completing the third season of "The Pineapple Diaries," a comedic web series that tells the story of four women living Jamaica Plain. The $1,000 grant was one of 29 granted from the Mayor’s Office of Arts and Culture, in collaboration with the Boston Cultural Council, as part of the fourth round of Opportunity Fund grants for 2018 in October. “Artists are doing incredible work in every neighborhood of our city, and it’s important that we continue to recognize and support their efforts,” said Mayor Marty Walsh. “I look forward to seeing Boston’s artists advance their careers and improve our communities through this program.”

The colorful, comedic web series, which can be enjoyed in its entirety here, is part sitcom, part ode to JP. As WBUR explains:
“The Pineapple Diaries” presents familiar 20-something struggles: from navigating an unfulfilling job, to rediscovering oneself after a divorce, to trying to become an Internet celebrity in our social media-obsessed age. These heartfelt, humorous stories find undeniable authenticity while portrayed through a rich cultural lens that’s often overlooked when people think of Jamaica Plain today.

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New Exhibit ‘Is the Dark Going to Catch Us’ at Jamaica Plain Branch Library

Myles Dunigan's "Is The Dark Going to Catch Us" is a new exhibit at the Jamaica Plain Branch Library, with black and white images that are reminiscent of photographer Ansel Adams' work. 

Dunigan's exhibit is the sixth, and last one of the year, from the partnership of the Friends of the Jamaica Plain Branch Library and UForge. Myles Dunigan's work uses different printmaking styles with photography and other media to produce layered, textured landscapes that straddle the line between abstraction and realism. The RISD graduate's work is described as, "Rendered in dark, antique hues, hints of scattered flora and mountain terrain weave in and out of more ambiguous motifs resembling cloud bursts or the surface of water." “In an era of technological saturation and cataclysmic weather, I draw upon the tropes of landscape painting to digitally forge new spaces that evoke the sublime and uncanny,” said Dunigan. Myles Dunigan's "Is the Dark Going to Catch Us" is on view at the Jamaica Plain Branch Library from Nov.

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JP Craftsman Shane Maxwell Hosts Textile-Inspired Workshops at Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

Weaving together the themes of the current Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum exhibition, Common Threads, Shane Maxwell, a Jamaica Plain-based craftsman, who oversees textile painting and dyeing for the Boston Ballet and The Santa Fe Opera (over the summer season), is teaching his textile-inspired techniques at an ongoing museum open studio series. Maxwell's Saturday Open Studio workshop series will run every Saturday, from Oct. 13 through Jan. 12, from 11 am to 4 pm. Saturday Open Studio events are included with museum admission.

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New Urbano Project Exhibition, ‘Wandering in the Land of Oblivion,’ Responds to Forced Migration and Displacement

Considering current events, artist Contanza Aguirre's new exhibition at Urbano Project is very timely. Her art references thousands of her fellow Colombians who were forced to leave the country due to the drug war and civil conflict. The Paris-based artist's exhibition features large-scale black and white works on paper that represent people in movement performing acts of human work and labor. Within her work she looks at emancipation and reclamation. "The social impact of Aguirre’s work resides in the fact that it acknowledges the importance of art and craft making­ – herein painting – as a meaningful and dynamic representation of the vital need of humanity for freedom and progress,” said French art critic Gérald Souillac, according to a press release.

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