Donley’s ‘Reading and Riding’ Art Exhibit at Jamaica Plain Library

The latest art exhibit at the Jamaica Plain Branch Library is Jan Donley's Reading and Riding, which opened May 6.  

"Though she studied traditional techniques, Donley has unexpectedly found the iPad to be her main canvas, believing that digital art is an important disruption to the art world. Her works on view display a distinctive collage style, combining digitally painted figures with text from various literary sources, including Lorraine Hansberry, Virginia Woolf, Emily Dickinson, and James Baldwin," said a press release from UForge, which is presenting the show in partnership with the Friends of the Jamaica Plain Branch Library. Donley is also a teacher. “My students come from all over the world, and they remind me that home is fragile and varied and elusive.

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‘In Close Proximity 2.0’ Art Exhibit at Jamaica Plain Branch Library Thru May 4

Unlike 2020, Jamaica Plain-based collage artist Marnie Jain's art exhibit at the Jamaica Plain Branch Library, was not cancelled thanks to the lousy pandemic. And you can check out Jain's In Close Proximity 2.0 exhibit at the library through May 4. The exhibit is part of the library's rotating art program, supported by The Friends of the Jamaica Plain Branch of the Boston Public Library in partnership with Uforge. Uforge described Jain's work:
With a steady hand and an incredible eye for detail, Marnie Jain is known for her delightful collage compositions featuring all manner of flora and fauna, with rabbits, frogs, birds, and snakes hidden among flowers and forest greenery. Using bright colors and a range of found imagery, her constructions are playful, textured, and often enlightening.

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‘Local Scenes’ is JP Library’s First Art Exhibition for ’19

Maybe you'll recognize some of the watercolors in the Jamaica Plain Branch Library's first art exhibition for the year because it's "Local Scenes" by Kevin Gillespie. The Jamaica Plain resident's work is often done en plein air, as he illustrates his neighborhood's natural scenes like the shadows of tree branches, water ripples, the four seasons of New England and more. This is the first of six art exhibitions at the library branch due to a partnership between the Friends of the Jamaica Plain Branch Library and the Uforge Gallery. The exhibition will be on view from Jan. 4 through Feb.

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New Exhibit ‘Is the Dark Going to Catch Us’ at Jamaica Plain Branch Library

Myles Dunigan's "Is The Dark Going to Catch Us" is a new exhibit at the Jamaica Plain Branch Library, with black and white images that are reminiscent of photographer Ansel Adams' work. 

Dunigan's exhibit is the sixth, and last one of the year, from the partnership of the Friends of the Jamaica Plain Branch Library and UForge. Myles Dunigan's work uses different printmaking styles with photography and other media to produce layered, textured landscapes that straddle the line between abstraction and realism. The RISD graduate's work is described as, "Rendered in dark, antique hues, hints of scattered flora and mountain terrain weave in and out of more ambiguous motifs resembling cloud bursts or the surface of water." “In an era of technological saturation and cataclysmic weather, I draw upon the tropes of landscape painting to digitally forge new spaces that evoke the sublime and uncanny,” said Dunigan. Myles Dunigan's "Is the Dark Going to Catch Us" is on view at the Jamaica Plain Branch Library from Nov.

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New Art Exhibition ‘Kristen Gossler: Confluence’ at Jamaica Plain Branch Library

In Kristen Gossler's art exhibition at the Jamaica Plain Branch Library, "Confluence," the expressive abstract paintings pose a question, wanting to provide an interactive experience to the viewer. Gossler uses a variety of materials, including water-based pigment, screen painting ink, sumi ink and acrylic paint. The RISD graduate utilizes "a mental inventory of repeated forms found in both the natural and manmade worlds, provoking a familiarity and comfort in the viewer through subliminal means." “The unconscious use of these symbols is not art – it is the cognitive filter of the artist that gives these paintings relevance and meaning as a body of work,” said Gossler. Her new exhibit uses earthy browns, warm yellows, soft greens, burnt oranges, while centering bold shapes and natural textures.

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